Timelines Aligned With Mind Findings

Science findings of mind signs aligned with refinement defines times.

Given findings of time, do times align, finding what lines define in minds?
Behind the line we may find a time to align, but in the mind everything remains fine.
Try defining the lines and mine the vines, but still find striving requiring defined time.
But do ties in the high mind lie behind a fine unwinding, refined, aligned?
Does the line decline eyes finding fine time behind relying on findings?
Requiring minding time finds tired eyes declining in a kind of confining.
In signs, lines assign trying findings, leading to recognized times confining, redefined.
While predetermined by grind, verifying style finds eyes tired and minds aligned.
Time core relevance develops a highly refined finding, likened to ripening vines.
Although formulated subjective time is likely less than findings seen refined.
But insufficient behind-line-time assignment reconciling takes time.
Despite questioning once or twice, casting defines revised signs.
Following over time, scientists five to nine cite higher kinds of signs, confirming findings.
These early findings stratify defined, like minds, based on combined lines.
At the end of time, being defined by science suggests trying otherwise finds lies.
But disguising citings like time-refined reassigning finds minds redesigned.
By only relying on time indexed by aligned mind refinement, some find:
Confined wiring rewrites revised, resigned minds, blindsiding redefined mind time.
Points and categories joining more fires ignite right brightness.
While predicated times find like minds behind in signs of mining kind lines.
What applies why temporal mindfulness finds guidance refined?
Determining combined science characterizes summarized findings, including:
Time-based, refined guidance mindfulness of a temporal variety, rightly applied.
By the same line, science finds flying time lines our minds. Likely fine.

Vision Deliberate - Richard Smith - Via RSMITHINGS.com

Vision Deliberate – Richard Smith – Via RSMITHINGS.com

April Is National Poetry Month.

 

How to Write a Blog Post: Cook Your Texty Cake with a Chef

Here’s an informative post from Omnipapers, using a cooking metaphor to illustrate the finer points of crafting a solid blog post. This is a thorough overview, covering the importance of including links, readying tweetable content and more. An editor from the site asked me if I’d share this here, and since I have a solid interest in blog development and writing, I thought it might be useful. Have a look and share your thoughts in the comments.

Via Omnipapers:

Every blogger and content writer should think of their audience first of all. Only happy and satisfied readers whose problems you solve will come to your blog again and again, generating its traffic and turning from readers into customers step by step.

Here’s the deal:

Writing a good blog post helps you interact with your audience. So, you should know how to create and structure top-notch content and let people know about that cool info you are going to share.

Are you sure you know how to create a blog post that rocks? Now, we are going to tell you how to write a blog post in terms of cooking a rainbow cake.

Sounds weird? We are sure, writing a post is like cooking something delicious; and we’ll reveal all ingredients of a perfect blog post and a recipe of “cooking” a texty (!) blog post.

Want to know the best part?

Check it out:

How to write a blog post

And now, it’s high time to talk about the ingredients for “cooking” a blog post that converts:

Headlines

A headline serves to attract readers’ attention to your post and helps them decide if they want to read it. Simple as that, isn’t it?

But did you know only 2 out of 10 people read your blog post after checking its headline? As well as appetizing toppings, your headlines should make people want to “eat” your blog post.

What is the recipe of writing an ideal headline?

  • Make it useful.
  • Use modifiers (for example, we used two modifiers in the headline of this blog post: “easy” and “how to”).
  • Mention the idea of your post.
  • Give them a sense of urgency (read Neil Patel’s Definite Guide ti Copywriting to understand when this trick works).
  • Come up with your own best headline formula.
  • Follow a headline format that will work for sure.

To make it easier, you are welcome to use different tools that help you come up with new ideas for good headlines. For example, try Online Headline Generator to choose one of 200 titles or use Emotional Headline Analyzer to choose a headline with the best Emotional Marketing Value.

Introduction

drake

Before writing your story itself, use the introduction with a hook. As we all know, this is the best way to make people interested in what you are going to tell them.

Plus, introduction is the second main element of a cool blog post after a headline.

Subheadings and lists

These elements help your readers scan your post visually to see if it has something interesting and useful for them.

Try to use a subheading every time you are going to tell something important.

Use lists to section a text that has many different elements: they help you organize thoughts and structure your text better.

Visual elements

Visual elements are very important for your blog post to have: they tell and demonstrate your readers something that is difficult to describe with words.

People love visual effects, as they do not want to spend hours on reading different texts online. So, do not be afraid and lazy to use the following elements in your posts:

  • Images
  • Photos
  • Tables
  • Videos
  • Diagrams

Relevant links

Using relevant links to authoritative websites in your blog posts helps you build your online reputation. Provide readers with useful information, confirm it by linking to opinion leaders, and motivate them to add your post to bookmarks.

“Tweetable” quotes

According to Derek Halpern, people are more likely to share your content if you give them a chance to post it in Twitter.

holmes

What can you do to make it easier for them?

There is a WordPress plugin from TodayMade that lets you make tweets from texts. Do not hesitate trying ClickToTweet instrument as well.

Call to action

Writing a blog post is important but finishing it is equally important, too. The last piece of your texty cake should be conclusion with a call to action.

Ask your readers to comment what they think of your post, let them share your article in their social media profiles, invite them to subscribe to your newsletter, etc.

And now, when you’ve finished reading this awesome post, would you be so kind to let us know what you think of it? 😉

Music of 1984

princeI’ve often thought 1984 was an incredible year for music. So many iconic releases. Such an exciting time for entertainment: movie soundtracks, MTV… break-dancing. So I was very happy to see this list of the 100 best singles of 1984, complete with YouTube links to each track (where available). And the writing accompanying each track is exceptional. My favorite has to be this brilliant characterization of “When Doves Cry” by Prince:

After the shrapnel of Prince’s introductory guitar volley settles, a hypnotic Linn drum pattern syncs with a synth figure courtly enough for a minuet. Vocals of cold menace and desperate abandon vie for preeminence until climatic screeches of pain carry the day.

Check out the entire list at Rolling Stone100 Best Singles of 1984: Pop’s Greatest Year

Noise Statement

Considered-Perspective-Richard-Smith-RSMITHINGS.com_

Here is noise the way that it goes. So goes the flow and into another row.
Lest we forget the next noise. Another time around, we go.

Wonder if the time will go by? Another time falling behind.
As if we ever wonder for another, there is nothing more to moving under.

If the time rolls by and we all still go, what will time before then show?
If we only could get the final sign, can another grow.

Under the understanding behind with another flower to grow.
Another sign, another time, another dent to the mind below.

Image: “Considered Perspective

Top 25 Mobile Photos of 2014 at Flickr

My photo, “Summer’s Requiem” is one of the
5 best black & white mobile images of the year at Flickr – woohoo!

Well, this is quite an honor. Of the billion+ photos uploaded to Flickr in 2014, one of mine was in the mobile top 25 according to the Flickr blog (#14, shown below), along with 24 other really great images — and one of only 5 black and whites. Thanks, Flickr!

flickr2014topmobile25Here’s what I say about this image at its page:

On the first day of fall, I was headed into a building for an early morning appointment. I looked down and noticed this leaf with the morning dew when walking in, but did not get a shot. After the appointment, it was still there with the glistening morning dew, and I stopped in my tracks so as not to miss it. The heart-shaped leaf and tear-like droplets framed by the concrete sidewalk all made the perfect metaphor at the changing of the seasons: happy reflections on the season past… maybe even sadness at its passing. But ahead of that: lovely things to come. To me, the best compositions are musical; you can almost hear them hum when you study them. So naturally, this would be a requiem. I converted to grayscale, added a slight vignette at the top and sharpened just a bit to highlight the macro-vision detail of the leaf’s veins, amplified by the water.

Thanks again for this incredible honor. Go follow me there and follow the Flickr Blog for a regular curated stream of consistently cool imagery.

 

Masters of Photography Art Feature

Many thanks to Masters of Photography for featuring my art! The site regularly features many excellent artists with a great layout, too. Very honored!

Originally posted on Mírame y sé color:

Richard Smith explores unexpected interrelationships between everyday images through surrealist photomontage. Working with elements from nature, pedestrian objects, specially-commissioned photos, and scenes from his travels and neighborhood, he fuses these components into ethereal yet cohesive views that transcend their origins. A self-taught graphic artist with 20+ years of professional experience, Smith incorporates assimilated photographic techniques and modern photomanipulation approaches into his hand-craftedcompositions.

Smith has been recognized globally for his photomontage art, with his pieces being shared across several U.S. and international creative venues.

View original

 

Add Now Playing Song to Playlist in iPhone

How hard would it be to include an “add to playlist” option for a currently playing song on an iPhone?

Apple Add To PlaylistThe near-largest technology company in the world, and the most profitable (Apple, duh) has yet to muster the resources to make this happen.

I’m not asking for anything fancy – maybe just tap and hold the artwork for a song in music? Or maybe use that menu in the top right? Easy!

iPhone owners have been asking for this for years. And years. And years.

I used to be able to do this on my iPod 4, for goodness sake. I’d hear a song, think “hey, that’s good for this playlist” and add it. Boom, done.

As of this writing, the only way to add songs to playlists is a cumbersome procedure of selecting the playlist first, navigating to a track, then manually adding that track.

Yes, more important threaten humanity, but this has gotta be in like… at least the top 50, right?

Please, Apple — add this feature in iOS for us. 

And to anyone reading who agrees, please request this from Apple feedback, or at my post on the Apple boards here. Thanks.