Tag Archives: Public speaking

Fomer NSA Director Interview via Amtrak. Thanks, Twitter.

Train conversation further cements Twitter as a social media/mass media, real-time, citizen-journalism news outlet.

Tom Matzzie and Michael HaydenAmtrak passenger Tom Matzzie live-tweeted an on-background interview between news media and former NSA director Michael Hayden (also ex-CIA director) from a commuter train known as the ACELA. It was fascinating to watch this play out, minute by minute on Matzzie’s Twitter feed, and later by traditional media. As this was happening, Hayden was alerted by his team, approached Matzzie offering to chat, and even posed for a photo.

The entire episode is now secured for the ages in the form of tweets and the ensuing news coverage.

The Rest of The Story: Cocktails?

Here’s more from Matzzie, himself, by phone, via Soundcloud, speculating as to why the former official may have been so candid:


It’s particularly mind-blowing that the former head of an organization whose focus is security would be so loud on a train, but hey, Hayden is, in fact, now a public speaker — even if, in this case, inadvertently.

What do you think? Have you ever followed a live tweeting of news in real-time? Have you ever been a citizen journalist, or cited by the media for your social media activities? Let us hear from you in the comments.

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop TalkingI just finished the audiobook of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain. This book makes many interesting revelations by way of neuroscience (like another I just reviewed, Deep Survival), giving scientific insight into the myriad of reasons of why introverts and extroverts are the way they are.

I’ve always considered myself an ambivert – I have varying tendencies in different situations, so this detailed look at introversion was of particular interest to me. I’m not shy, and do enjoy public speaking, performing and experiencing the world – yet I’m very independently minded in my approach.

Much of Quiet seems to work at making introverts feel okay about who they are, which is understandable. But what I enjoyed more was how it made sense of the biological reasonings and structural evidence for this parallel of personalities. Consider this take on extroverts at dinner parties:

The ability to process a lot of short-term information at once without becoming distracted or overly stressed – this is just the sort of brain function extroverts tend to be well-suited for. In other words, extroverts are sociable because their brains are good at handling competing demands on their attention — which is just what dinner-party conversation involves. In contrast, introverts often feel repelled by social events that force them to attend to many people at once.

Compare this with the introvert perspective:

When introverts assume the observer role, as when they write novels, or contemplate unified field theory – or fall quiet at dinner parties – they’re not demonstrating a failure of will or lack of energy. They’re simply doing what they’re constitutionally suited for.

This is not to say that all introverts or  extroverts are the same categorically, and the book does stress this in several places. But that these are two different approaches due to a variety of factors, each valid in their own way, and each capable of benefitting by better understanding the other – a concept advanced by this book.

Introverts UNITE (separately)

This design available at printfection.com

Musical accompaniment – “Quiet” by the Smashing Pumpkins:

What do you think? Do you consider yourself an introvert or extrovert? Do you find advantages or disadvantages in either case? Let us hear from you in the comments.