Tag Archives: winston-salem

Single Image Saturdays: Spring is Springing


From today’s afternoon walk around town. Shot via iPhone using Hipstamatic with Libatique 73 lens and Ina’s 1969 film. Full-size version over at Flickr.

Saturday At The Gas Station

Family Fare BP, Winston-Salem, NC

Click for full view

I’m here several times a week. Neighborhood c-store. One night, the perfect photo op presented itself. Love it when that happens. Leading lines, lighting, lack of interference, and a moment to realize. Art is everywhere; we just have to notice it.

What do you think? Ever noticed beauty in ordinary surroundings? Do you see the world differently because of studying photos or another type of experience? Let us hear from you in the comments.

Stylized Instamatic 104

Stylized Instamatic 104 by rsmithing

I dig the convergence of technology and time here in one brief second, now extended to the world and infinity. Here’s a snapshot of one of our modern photographic ancestors I modified with the amazing ToonPaint iPhone app, after shooting with Hipstamtic (a modern-retro simulator, no less). I found the camera at a sweet vintage shop called “Ideas” on Burke Street, Winston-Salem, NC.

What do you think? Do you see a connection between analog cameras and today’s mobile photography? What apps or camera discoveries have you made lately? Let us hear from you in the comments.

When an afternoon thunderstorm sends you into the right spot at the right time…

Mooney's Mediterranean Cafe. Click to see more like this on the Pinterest board of my iPhoneography.

Mooney’s Mediterranean Cafe, Winston-Salem, NC.
Click to see more like this on the Pinterest board of my iPhoneography.

Downtown on a Saturday just after the start of a thunderstorm was the perfect place for this quick snapshot of a peaceful moment, reflecting on the day so far and the future ahead, while anticipating Mooneys‘ excellent shawerma over hummus. In retrospect, I’m grateful for having the technology and inclination to document the moment. It was one of those simple times that’s easy to forget, but worthwhile to remember.

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What do you think? Ever serendipitously documented a moment that you only realized later? Ever wish you’d done that? How do you think you might do that in the future? Let us hear from you in the comments!

Vintage Travelers

A view of some well-traveled old souls from the local antique mall. When people carried their bags, dressed for travel, and wore hats. Shot via iPhone using Hipstamatic with Blanko film & John S. Lens.

Have you ever owned this style of suitcase? Do you have memories of your parents or grandparents having such? Ever find anything cool at an antique mall (and if so, what)? Let us hear from you in the comments.

Photography, Technology and Connections in the Name of Art

I find it awesome when the digital and “real” worlds intersect for collective benefit, especially in the name of art.

Two Winston-Salem Arts Institutions

I just had the pleasure of attending a free lecture hosted by SECCA — The Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art — about select photographic works of our city’s Arts Council (full disclosure below). Because of technology, a passion for art, and social networking, the experience became amplified. And that sort of thing gives me hope for the world.

Several items from the council’s photography collection were to be on display at a local gallery, and Michael Christiano, Curator of Education at SECCA (check them out on WordPress), gave a crash course in photographic appreciation to start the evening off.

In the span of 20 minutes, he covered many of the greats — Robert Frank, Edward Weston, Jerry Uelsmann (my all-time favorite & inspiration) — along with several others, highlighting how the collection’s works being shared were representative of the media’s progression over time. In a larger sense, this collection and these artists aside, it was a notable reflection on how the technology of photography lets us put form to something intangible like memory.

Think of a photo that ever brought a “wow” from your lips.
Kiss Me Like You Promise Me Heaven in Your Lips

Kiss Me Like You Promise Me Heaven in Your Lips – © Sion Fullana. All Rights Reserved.

Considering such technology didn’t even exist two centuries ago, it’s rather an amazing jump in human communication that we practically take for granted nowadays, what with cameras in our phones and everywhere else.

But it’s that jump in communication having to do with photography that compels this post. Because of my growing interest/obsession with street photography and iPhoneography (thanks to Instagram and appreciating the art of others), I, of course, had to snap the below image with my phone just as the lecture was getting started. The meta-ness of the moment was too great not to indulge:

Meta-techno-photography moment captured. Click for the full conversation.

A photo from my iPhone at a lecture on photography prior to a photography exhibit that I later published via a photo-sharing app. Now you’re reading a blog about it.

Naturally, this immediately went up on Instagram.

The evening progressed; the lecture was great; we perused photos and headed home. Later that night, @lindsyarb — someone I’ve never met except via Instagram — noticed the photo, asking to know more about the event and who hosted. Turns out we’re all in the same city, so I shared SECCA’s details and she signed up for their mailing list.

Instagram Conversation

Did you catch what just happened there?

Through technology, interest in art is shared and fostered — relative to the local community, no less — connections are made, and we actually live through a jump in human communication… not over the centuries, but over wi-fi and social networks in real-time… through a shared appreciation for the creative spirit fostered by photography.

Now that’s art. Or at the very least, I’ve got a little more hope for the world. 🙂

Have you ever made a real-world connection via social media? Is there an Arts Council or equivalent in your city, and do you take part? How have you come to be inspired in an artistic fashion, and do you enjoy sharing that with others? Let us hear from you in the comments.

Hey Look, A Photo Booth! This is Private… Right?

Dec 08 2011 21:12PM 7.453 cc94094a,

Me and the Mrs. having fun in the photo booth. Good clean fun.

So I was at this fundraiser last night, which was a huge affair and likely a roaring success. I’m very proud of our community for coming out to have a fun time while supporting a good cause and enjoying the downtown nightlife. There happened to be this photo booth setup with props and instant prints — you get behind a curtain, take 4 digital photos in 10 seconds, and get a printout instantly. It was even free! (Or, included in the price of the event ticket). Totally fun.

And hey, you can even go online to view them the next day. The guy handing my prints told me so, and there’s a website on the back. Easy-breezy! Cool!

I hope he told everyone else this, because everyone else’s photos are there as well. What looks to be every… single… photo. My guess is that these have been screened for gang signs, product placement and, um… body parts, but I wonder if everyone realized their snapshots would be available for the world to see the next day?

Congratulations, You’re Famous!

If there was a sign stating these would be online, complete with social sharing buttons on every pic’s page, I didn’t see one. Not that I’d ever do anything at a public event that I wouldn’t want, you know… public, but being behind a curtain in a booth implies an idea of privacy, especially when you walk away with the prints in your hand. That is no longer so in our technoconnected world, and to assume otherwise is naive.

Click for full size (new window)

Say, there’s no way someone’s gonna post this on a blog, right?

Don’t get me wrong — I think the modern photo booth is a fantastic idea and I hope the venture and this local franchisee makes a million bucks. What with the rise of vintage effects and retro cameras now supercharged with the speed, portability and low cost of digital photography, I think it’s wonderful to bring back an “old-timey” experience, and especially to make sharing easy. But I gotta wonder if — and do hope — everyone else pictured is cool with that.

What do you think? Have you ever been in a “for-real” photo booth that uses film? Or have you ever done one like this with digital prints and social media capability? Does this raise privacy issues, or should we all assume we’re free game? Tell us in the comments.